Mary Watkins, Ph.D. Books

 liberation
Toward Psychologies Of Liberation

“This landmark book takes us on an unforgettable journey across disciplines, countries, spiritualities, and techniques to teach us twenty-first century psychologies of liberation. Authors Watkins and Shulman transform the discipline of psychology, showing us its connections to all disciplines concerned with liberating the imagination. Across international fields of difference, these authors never give up the prize: social and psychic emancipation. In doing so, they define what “decoloniality” means for the twenty-first century.”

Chela Sandoval, Associate Professor of Liberation Philosophy; Chair, Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara




 

WakingDreams:
Waking Dreams

"What is the relevance of daydreams, active imagination, and inner voices to the practice of psychotherapy, education, and life? Historical, critical, and clinical, this book describes American and European approaches to the image."







 

 


InvisibleGuestsbook:
Invisible Guests: The Development of Imaginal Dialogues. Review

"An eloquent critique of developmental and clinical psychologies and their insistence on listening to only one voice per person. Dr. Mary Watkins is the only person now writing on imagination who knows the field completely, thinks beautifully, and can teach just how to proceed with interior dialogues with imaginal personages."

James Hillman, Ph.D.



 


TalkingChildrenAdoption:
Talking With Young Children About Adoption. Review

"Current wisdom holds that adoptive parents should talk with their child about adoption as early as possible. But no guidelines exist to prepare parents for the various ways their children might respond when these conversations take place. In this wise and sympathetic book, a clinical psychologist and a psychiatrist, both adoptive mothers, discuss how young children make sense of the fact that they are adopted, how it might appear in their play, and what worries they and their parents may have. Accounts by twenty adoptive parents of conversations about adoption with their children, from ages two to ten, graphically convey what the process of sharing about adoption is like."